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Posted on 1 December 2021

Word for Word #43 Word of the Year 2021

In this, the final episode of season 6, we join the Word of the Year Committee to discuss which word was crowned the Macquarie Dictionary Word of the Year 2021, the selection process and other words from the short list. Join us as we explore our language: the ways we use it, the ways we abuse it, and the ways we ultimately change it.  You can also explore the 'additional links' below to discover what new words and definitions have been on our editor's minds in recent months.  Subscribe now on iTunes, Soundcloud, Stitcher, Spotify, Amazon or your favourite podcast app to get the latest episode delivered direct to your inbox.   Words & Definitions
  • brain tickler
  • brick-bait
  • Delta
  • dignity suit
  • dry scooping
  • dump cake
  • front-stab
  • hate-follow
  • humane washing
  • last chance tourism
  • menty-b
  • NFT
  • porch pirate
  • range anxiety
  • shadow pandemic
  • sober curious
  • strollout
  • third place
  • wokescold
  Additional links Word of the Year 2021 Word of the Year 2021 Shortlist Suggest a Word Word for Word episode #29 Word of the Year 2019 Word for Word episode #37 Word of the Year 2020   Acknowledgements Word for Word is produced by Macmillan Audio Australia for Macquarie Dictionary and Pan Macmillan Australia.  Music used in this episode is by Broke For Free, available from the Free Music Archive and used by permission of the artist. Find more music by Broke for Free including The Gold Lining; and If. Our logo is by Amy Sherington. All sound effects and clips are public domain, royalty-free, or used by permission. If you like Word for Word, leave us a review on Apple Podcasts! It only takes a minute and it helps other people discover the show.  
Posted on 22 November 2021

Word of the Year 2021 | Shortlist

The Macquarie Dictionary Word of the Year voting is open now. The below shortlist was chosen from the 15 categories under consideration for Word of the Year 2021. You can review the words and definitions below. Find out which word became the Word of the Year 2021 here. Access a pdf of the shortlist here. You can also view the entire longlist here.   brain tickler noun Colloquial a nasopharyngeal swab, as used for COVID-19 testing.   brick-bait noun a strategy designed to encourage customers to shop at bricks-and-mortar stores rather than online, as by providing personalised service, pleasant surroundings, etc. Also, brick bait.   Delta noun a variant (B.1.617.2) of the coronavirus SARS-CoV-2 which causes COVID-19. Also, Delta variant.   dignity suit noun adaptive clothing in the form of a jumpsuit elasticised at the waist, with a zip at the back to prevent the wearer from undressing, especially as designed for people living with dementia, Alzheimer's disease, etc.   dry scooping noun the practice of ingesting powdered pre-workout supplements or protein powder without mixing with water or milk as directed.   dump cake noun a cake which is prepared by combining the ingredients directly in the cake tin or dish in which it is to be baked.   front-stab verb (tColloquial to betray (someone) openly, without subterfuge. Also, front stab. –front-stabber, noun   hate-follow verb (t) Internet to link oneself to (a site on a social network) even though one dislikes or disagrees with the content being shared.   humane washing noun the misleading marketing of a product sourced from animals, deceptively giving the impression that the animals have been treated humanely.   last chance tourism noun tourism to locations with endangered landscapes or geological features, or which are habitats for endangered species. Also, last-chance tourism.   menty-b noun Colloquial a breakdown in one's mental health. Also, menty b.   NFT noun a unique digital certificate which uses blockchain technology to certify ownership, authenticity and scarcity of a digital asset, such as a digital image, video, tweet, domain name, etc.; non-fungible token.   porch pirate noun Colloquial a person who steals parcels which have been left outside a home by a deliverer. –porch piracy, noun   range anxiety noun the stress experienced by the driver of an electric vehicle when they are unsure of reaching their destination or a recharging point before the vehicle's battery runs out of power.   shadow pandemic noun an increase in mental health problems and domestic and family violence attributed to living with the stresses and restrictions of the COVID-19 pandemic.   sober curious adjective having an interest in reducing one's consumption of alcohol or in giving it up altogether.   strollout noun Colloquial (humorous) the rollout of the COVID-19 vaccination program in Australia, with reference to the perceived lack of speed.   third place noun the social environments where people spend time away from home or work. Also, third space.   wokescold verb (t) 1.  to rebuke (a person) for having beliefs that are perceived to be accepting of prejudice or discrimination. –noun 2.  a person who issues such rebukes.
Posted on 19 October 2021

Word for Word #42 The 50 words project

In this episode of Word for Word, Melissa Kemble and Alison Moore interview Professor Rachel Nordlinger and Associate Professor Nick Thieberger, two linguists from the University of Melbourne about the 50 Words Project, which aims to provide a selection of 50 words in every Indigenous language of Australia.  Join us as we explore our language: the ways we use it, the ways we abuse it, and the ways we ultimately change it.  You can also explore the 'additional links' and definitions below to learn more about our favourite swear words.  Subscribe now on iTunes, Soundcloud, Stitcher, Spotify, Amazon or your favourite podcast app to get the latest episode delivered direct to your inbox.   Words & Definitions Macquarie Dictionary definitions from this episode:
  • Wik-Mungkan
Additional Links Read more about the topics and themes discussed: The 50 Words Project Loan words from Australian Languages Macquarie Atlas of Indigenous Australia: 2nd Edition Macquarie Aboriginal Words: Datiwuy, Eastern Arrernte, Murrinh-Patha Macquarie Aboriginal Words: Nyungar, Gooniyandi, Yindjibarndi Word for Word #9 Australian Indigenous languages  Word for Word #23 Noongar: the pulse of language   Acknowledgements Word for Word is produced by Macmillan Audio Australia for Macquarie Dictionary and Pan Macmillan Australia.  Music used in this episode is by Broke For Free, available from the Free Music Archive and used by permission of the artist. Find more music by Broke for Free including The Gold Lining; and If. Our logo is by Amy Sherington. All sound effects and clips are public domain, royalty-free, or used by permission. If you like Word for Word, leave us a review on Apple Podcasts! It only takes a minute and it helps other people discover the show.
Posted on 21 September 2021

A ruby-dazzler of an anniversary

Forty years ago, on 21 September 1981, the first edition of Australia’s national dictionary, the Macquarie Dictionary, was launched. A green and gold cocktail was invented for the occasion (see recipe below), the room was festooned with wattle, and eminent historian, Manning Clark, carried out the launching honours. The vice-chancellor of Macquarie University, Professor Edwin Webb (below left), made a short speech before asthmatically fleeing into the night, away from the wattle, to which he was highly allergic.    Copies of the new dictionary were pored over, favourite Australianisms were looked up, cries of 'It’s in!' were heard throughout the evening. After all, this was a fully descriptive dictionary, containing the gamut of Australian English. The publishing director, Dan O’Keefe, had gone through the pages just before the dictionary went to print, looking for running heads (those bold guide words at the top of each page) that could be offensive to more delicate readers. The usual suspects were checked. The page with cunt-struck (also discussed back in 2015 after an appearance on Four Corners) as a running head was adjusted slightly to bring the more innocuous headword cup back, and so become the running head. However, much to Dan’s chagrin, one of the discoveries of launch night was a running head in a usually innocuous part of the dictionary – what could possibly be offensive around mother? Mother-fucker – that’s what. The Macquarie Cocktail (Green and Gold)
  • Brut champagne
  • 1 tbsp mango juice
  • Dash of Angostura bitters
  • Dash of Grand Marnier
  • Whole strawberry, leaves attached, floating (the ‘green’ aspect)
  • Mint (optional additional ‘green’ aspect)
In the intervening forty years, the Macquarie Dictionary has continued to describe our language, warts and all. The internet has made research both easier and more difficult – it’s now a very different ballpark to the days of circling words in a newspaper or novel, jotting down (on the back of a chequebook!) words heard in conversation, on the bus, on radio and TV, then waiting for more citations to come in until finally judging a word to be well-used enough to be included in the dictionary. There have been complaints about the inclusion of words referring to truly horrible racist, sexist, sleazy opinions and acts. As long as these are current in the community they will continue to be part of the dictionary, just as they are part of Australian English. Naturally, these words carry warnings in the form of labels and usage notes indicating their offensive nature. The Macquarie Dictionary in 1981 contained about 80,000 headwords. The Macquarie Dictionary Eighth Edition, published in 2020, had nearly 110,000. The Macquarie Dictionary online has more than 130,000 headwords. The language is constantly changing and Macquarie continues to keep a finger on its pulse.  You can keep in touch with us across social media, as well as in our podcast, Word for Word. And feel free to suggest words for the next edition by submitting them through our website.
Posted on 8 October 2019

A quick look at the Macquarie Atlas of Indigenous Australia

The Macquarie Atlas of Indigenous Australia, Second Edition is a unique tool for exploring and understanding the lives and cultures of Australia's First Peoples. Combining the magic of maps with the latest data from the 2016 Australian Bureau of Statistics, the Atlas allows us to explore a visual history of Indigenous Australia.  About the contributors This second edition of the Macquarie Atlas of Indigenous Australia is a collabroative publication of the Australian National University, the Australian Bureau of Statistics and Macquarie Dictionary. General Editors Bill Arthur and Frances Morphy have been researching Indigenous affairs and working closely with Indigenous communities for several decades. In 2001 they began working on the first edition of the atlas, which took out the award of Overall Winner in the 2006 Australian Awards for Excellence in Educational Publishing (EEPA). In 2017, they began working on this second edition of the Atlas. Across both editions, there have been over 40 contributors who have researched, written and mapped the content in the Atlas under the general editorship of Bill and Frances. One of the primary aims for this second edition was to increase the presence of Indigenous people contributing to the project. These contributors are drawn from a wide variety of places and professions - from academia, the arts world, Indigenous organisations and the public service. A full list of chapter contributors is available here. About the cover art The cover art, titled Kungkarrangkalpa Tjurkurpa, is a collaborative painting made by Anawari Inpiti Mitchell, Angilyiya Tjapitji Mitchell, Lalla West, Jennifer Nginyaka Mitchell, Eileen Tjayanka Woods, Lesley Laidlaw and Robert Woods at the Papulankutja Artists group in the Northern Territory. The Seven Sisters Songline refers to the Pleiades constellation. It travels from the west to the east across the far western and central deserts. The sisters are pursued by a man, Yurla in the west and Wati Nyiru further east, who is a shapeshifter with transformative powers. He becomes particularly besotted with one of the sisters and pursues them endlessly in order to possess them. Today, this saga is visible in the Orion constellation and the Pleiades star cluster as a constant reminder of the consequences of attempting to possess something through wrongful means. Cover Art: "Kungkarrangkalpa Tjurkurpa", 2015, a collaborative painting made by Anawari Inpiti Mitchell, Angilyiya Tjapitji Mitchell, Lalla West, Jennifer Nginyaka Mitchell, Eileen Tjayanka Woods, Lesley Laidlaw and Robert Woods  About the maps There are several types of maps in the atlas. Among those featured are thematic maps which indicate the occurrence of phenomena across parts of the country, or an event or feature at particular locations and chloropleth maps which show the distribution of socio-economic data. Also featured are choropleth maps, maps with proportional symbols, column maps, as well as graphs, charts and illustrations. More information is available within the atlas itself. Earlier attempts to map Indigenous people at the national level include Norman Tinsdale's iconic map 'Tribal boundaries in Aboriginal Australia', based on research that had been carried out between 1930 and 1974. This map is discussed in detail within the book, but it was "significant in the genesis of the atlas." The version of the map used in the Atlas is an adaptation of Tindale's map. It includes "Indigenous group boundaries existing at the time of first European settlement in Australia, as far as they could be determined. It is not intended to represent contemporary relationships to land." Earlier examples of national mapping tended to deal with just single subjects. While acknowledging and drawing on them, this atlas surveys a comprehensive range of cultural, social and economic traits in a large set of national maps. Find out more The Macquarie Atlas of Indigenous Australia is available in hardback and as a fixed-layout ebook. This ebook is available as part of Apple's Volume Purchase program which allows educational institutions to purchase copies in volume and distribute to students and teachers for use in the classroom and at home. There is also a comprehensive Teacher's Guide available for free download.
Word of the Day
Posted on 3 December 2021

bargeboard

An overhanging board along the projecting sloping edge of a gable roof.