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power pole

a pole made of wood, iron, or iron girders and cement, for holding electrical cables supplying houses, etc. Compare hydro pole, SEC pole, Stobie pole, telegraph pole, telepole.
hydro pole

noun a power pole. Compare power pole, SEC pole, Stobie pole, telegraph pole, telepole.
Contributor's comments: In Tassie, it is more commonly called a hydro-pole. A telegraph pole, when still in use, was more commonly made of an iron girder not the wooden pole of the 'power pole'
SEC pole

noun a power pole. Compare hydro pole, power pole, Stobie pole, telegraph pole, telepole.
Contributor's comments: State Electricity Commission - at least previously 'of Victoria'

Contributor's comments: I have heard the term. My father (an electrician) also taught me how to read the round metal tag embedded in the pole about 5ft above the ground. The tag code gave the height of the SEC pole, the type of tree used, and the date it was "planted" ( - ie installed).

Contributor's comments: We generally referred to the poles in suburban streets as "power poles". The term "SEC Poles" or "SEC Pylons" was generally used for those large-scale pylons which extend across entire suburbs or districts to carry electricy from the generators.
Stobie pole

noun a power pole. Compare hydro pole, power pole, SEC pole, telegraph pole, telepole. [from JC Stobie, design engineer with the Adelaide Electric Supply Company]

Contributor's comments: Specifically Stobie Poles are Powerpoles made from a steel girder & concrete.

Contributor's comments: The particular feature of the stobie pole is that it is constructed of steel and concrete, rather than wood as used in other States. Cars always come off second best if they drive into one.

Contributor's comments: In Upper Hunter we have timber power poles that are quite often referred to as "telegraph poles".

Contributor's comments: Stobies/stobie poles are steel framed with concrete infill power poles designed by a Mr Stobie & used as power transmission poles in Adelaide & SA generally. Being a very dry state SA did not have suitable timber resources to produce timber power poles as used in other states so stobies were developed. They are particularly ugly & are a significant factor in road accidents as there is less give when hit by a vehicle than with timber poles. The saving grace though is that they are produced locally from local products - steel & cement, eliminating the need to import poles: "Stobies line roads and highways and are ofter criticised because of their ugliness."


Contributor's comments: Please ignore the postcode [6770] above, no one uses stobie pole here - I used it growing up in Whyalla, and I might add that having lived outside SA I can vouch that no one else knows what I am talking about when I say Stobie pole!

Contributor's comments: power pole: "Check out the spoggie on the stobie pole."

Contributor's comments: Electricity pole: "Look at all the birds sitting on the stobie pole."

Contributor's comments: stobey pole: electricity poles (telegraph poles) made of 2 steel gurders side by side with concrete in between. Invented by Mr Stobey I think: "Turn left at the third stobey pole in Smith Street."
telegraph pole

A utilities pole for carrying overhead cables (which haven't had anything to do with telegraphy for decades). Outside Tasmania I have mainly heard "power pole" or "Stovey pole" (sp??): There were live wires on the ground after the storm blew down the telegraph pole. Compare hydro pole, power pole, SEC pole, Stobie pole, telepole.

Contributor's comments: In Tassie, it is more commonly called a hydro-pole. A telegraph pole, when still in use was more commonly made of an iron girder not the wooden pole of the 'power pole'

Contributor's comments: I grew up in Sydney where we always called them "telegraph poles", and nothing else (not even power pole, nor electricity pole, as logical as these names obviously are). Here they are all wooden, and carry the telephone lines as well as the power cables.

Contributor's comments: In Upper Hunter we have timber power poles that are quite often referred to as "telegraph poles".

Contributor's comments: They are called telegraph poles in Brisbane also.

Contributor's comments: I'm in the electricity supply industry and I'm pretty sure "Stobie" poles are the flat cement and steel poles used mostly in SA .These are primarially in areas where termites are a problem and appear in smaller numbers all around Aust.
telepole

refers to a telegraph pole or electricity pole. Commonly used by Broken Hill people. Possibly old Cornish word: A car ran into a telepole on the south road last night. Compare hydro pole, power pole, SEC pole, Stobie pole, telegraph pole.

Contributor's comments: I, too, know this term from Broken Hill in the 1960s. It is not used in Adelaide.